Digital Scholars course contract, Fall 2010

21st century digital boys and girls, welcome to the 2010 Fall Semester. Below please find the “course contract” for taking ENG 5998-02 for credit. Just one credit, but a really good one. Any questions, please contact the course organizer.

Course Description

Started in Spring 2010, “Digital Scholars” is an interdisciplinary reading and discussion group devoted to the digital humanities, instructional technologies, and electronic and online scholarship. Our goal is to analyze the trends and critical issues in the digitization of materials and methods in humanities scholarship. Though housed in the English department and associated with the History of Text Technologies (HoTT) program, the group welcomes participants from any humanities department, technology center, or library, whatever their particular rank of student, staff, administration, or faculty. Discussions are currently planned for:

  • Hacking the Academy: Alternative Peer Review and Scholarly Production
  • Text Analysis and How to “Not Read” Books
  • Digital Collaboration and Unconferencing
  • Maps, GIS, and the Spatial Humanities
  • Digital Pedagogies

Requirements

“Digital Scholars” does not require enrollment to participate, though it is technically a one-credit (pass/fail) graduate course in English appearing under the rubric ENG 5998-02. Those graduate students taking ENG 5998-02 for credit will need to fulfill certain requirements over the course of the semester, to be evaluated by the group’s faculty adviser. These requirements include:

  1. Attendance at monthly meetings during the semester. Due to the large and diverse nature of the group’s membership, the scheduling is complicated. Should group meetings occur during a time an enrolled student cannot make, we can work out a form of reading and response to compensate and count as attendance.
  2. Reading. Graduate participants must complete all the assigned readings in advance of group meetings.
  3. Blogging. Starting this fall, the group will move many of its resources to a publicly-available WordPress blog (https://digitalscholars.wordpress.com). The blog will facilitate access to the group and  its events, as well as provide the group an online forum to share ideas or resources and reflect further on our discussions. Enrolled graduate students will each contribute to the blog a digest of any of our recent meetings, to be done on a schedule. Contributions are also welcome on other subjects. For inspiration, check out the blog from UVa’s Scholars Lab (http://www.scholarslab.org/blog/), on which affiliated graduate students report on their projects, research, or thinking about digital humanities.

Group resources

The majority of the resources for “Digital Scholars” are available on a dedicated site in FSU’s Blackboard system, and whenever possible will be made available via the blog. However, over the course of the semester, the group will also experiment with some of the tools of digital scholarship under consideration. These might include collaborative document systems, citation management, textual analysis software, video conferencing, blogs, social networking, etc. Specifics will be decided by the group, and participation will be voluntary.

Zotero group for Digital Scholars
http://www.zotero.org/groups/digital_scholars

Twitter @digitalscholars
http://www.twitter.com/digitalscholars

Lead instructor

Paul Fyfe
Assistant Professor
English, History of Text Technologies
pfyfe (at) fsu (dot) edu
Twitter @pfyfe
Office: Williams 427
Hours: Wed 1:00 – 3:00 pm and lots of times by appointment

Started in Spring 2010, “Digital Scholars” is an interdisciplinary reading and discussion group devoted to the digital humanities, instructional technologies, and electronic and online scholarship. Our goal is to analyze the trends and critical issues in the digitization of materials and methods in humanities scholarship. Though housed in the English department and associated with the History of Text Technologies (HoTT) program, the group welcomes participants from any humanities department, technology center, or library, whatever their particular rank of student, staff, administration, or faculty.

Specific topics will be finalized by the group, though discussions are currently planned for:

  • Hacking the Academy: Alternative Peer Review and Scholarly Production
  • Text Analysis and How to “Not Read” Books
  • Digital Collaboration and Unconferencing
  • Maps, GIS, and the Spatial Humanities
  • Digital Pedagogies

Requirements

“Digital Scholars” does not require enrollment to participate, though it is technically a one-credit (pass/fail) graduate course in English appearing under the rubric ENG 5998-02. Those graduate students taking ENG 5998-02 for credit will need to fulfill certain requirements over the course of the semester, to be evaluated by the group’s faculty adviser. These requirements include:

1. Attendance at monthly meetings during the semester. Due to the large and diverse nature of the group’s membership, the scheduling is complicated. Should group meetings occur during a time an enrolled student cannot make, we can work out a form of reading and response to compensate and count as attendance.

2. Reading. Graduate participants must complete all the assigned readings in advance of group meetings.

3. Blogging. Starting this fall, the group will move many of its resources to a publically-available WordPress blog (https://digitalscholars.wordpress.com). The blog will facilitate access to the group and  its events, as well as provide the group an online forum to share ideas or resources and reflect further on our discussions. Enrolled graduate students will each contribute to the blog a digest of any of our recent meetings, to be done on a schedule. Contributions are also welcome on other subjects. For inspiration, check out the blog from UVa’s Scholars Lab (http://www.scholarslab.org/blog/), on which affiliated graduate students report on their projects, research, or thinking about digital humanities.


Group resources

For convenience, the majority of the resources for “Digital Scholars” are available on a dedicated site in FSU’s Blackboard system. However, over the course of the semester, I would encourage the group to experiment with some of the tools of digital scholarship under consideration. These might include collaborative document systems, citation management, textual analysis software, video conferencing, blogs, social networking, etc. Specifics will be decided by the group, and participation will be voluntary.

Zotero group: Digital Scholars

http://www.zotero.org/groups/digital_scholars

Twitter: @digitalscholars

http://www.twitter.com/digitalscholars

Lead instructor

Paul Fyfe

Assistant Professor

English, History of Text Technologies

pfyfe@fsu.edu

Twitter: @pfyfe

Office: Williams 427

Hours: Wed 1:00 – 3:00 pm and lots of times by appointment

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